The balance of this sculpture smoothly finished and gaily painted is almost perfect. The projection of the beak is counterbalanced by the tail and by the ascension of the spiral. The hornbill casque swirls upward into a great spiral and the upswept tail, wings, and scrollwork headcrest also include delicate flower forms.
History of the Object: The celestial male conterpart of the underworld dragon goddess is the rhinoceros hornbill. Among the Iban, the hornbill is the messenger of the remote High God Singalang Burong. According to Micheal Heppell, enemies or their souls are dealt with by carving the effigy of a female rhinoceros hornbill (Kenyalang), animating it and sendind its spirit off to attack them. An infant hornbill is usually carved. His function is to reinforce the female in her role of mother and nourisher. made in the early part of the 20th c. Borneo.

The balance of this sculpture smoothly finished and gaily painted is almost perfect. The projection of the beak is counterbalanced by the tail and by the ascension of the spiral. The hornbill casque swirls upward into a great spiral and the upswept tail, wings, and scrollwork headcrest also include delicate flower forms.

History of the Object: The celestial male conterpart of the underworld dragon goddess is the rhinoceros hornbill. Among the Iban, the hornbill is the messenger of the remote High God Singalang Burong. According to Micheal Heppell, enemies or their souls are dealt with by carving the effigy of a female rhinoceros hornbill (Kenyalang), animating it and sendind its spirit off to attack them. An infant hornbill is usually carved. His function is to reinforce the female in her role of mother and nourisher. made in the early part of the 20th c. Borneo.

This sword was bought by Jean-Marc Bel on May 24, 1897 from the Attapeu Lao chief Cham Tha Kromokan Fondeng, who received 116 piastres for this sword.

made of gold, silver and metal between 1790-1830. Decorated knives and swords, handed down from elder to elder indicate the rank of their owner in Tai-speaking families. Many have ivory handles. The finest are covered with silver or gold - Tai goldsmiths being held in high esteem. Worn on ceremonial occasions, they also represent the symbolic “presence” of the noble family at the altar during a variety of rites. 

Early 20th c. silk woven ikat hanging from Cambodia.
These hangings (pidan) are woven by woman as donations to the temple where they adorn the altar of Buddha. Like other religious donations, a pidan offering is considered a source of merit taken into account in subsequent rebirths in Theravâda Buddhism. Their main themes depict episodes in Buddha’s life, his previous existences, the Jâtaka, or Buddhist cosmology. The theme here is the Three Worlds, or the three “lands” of the universe. 
This particular piece was acquired in 1931 for the Colonial Exhibition in Paris, 1931 

Early 20th c. silk woven ikat hanging from Cambodia.

These hangings (pidan) are woven by woman as donations to the temple where they adorn the altar of Buddha. Like other religious donations, a pidan offering is considered a source of merit taken into account in subsequent rebirths in Theravâda Buddhism. Their main themes depict episodes in Buddha’s life, his previous existences, the Jâtaka, or Buddhist cosmology. The theme here is the Three Worlds, or the three “lands” of the universe. 

This particular piece was acquired in 1931 for the Colonial Exhibition in Paris, 1931