heartoflaos
fuckyeahapihistory:

Group of Lao praying around a floral centerpiece (pha kwan), part of a Buddhist baci ceremony. Minneapolis Photograph Collection 1981.
Briefly the Baci or su kwan, which means “calling of the soul,”is a ceremony to celebrate a special event, whether a marriage, a homecoming, a welcome, a birth, or one of the annual festivals. A mother is given a baci after she has recovered form a birth, the sick are given bacis to facilitate a cure, officials are honored by bacis, and novice monks are wished luck with a baci before entering the temple. The Baci ceremony can take place any day of the week and all year long, preferably before noon or before sunset. 

fuckyeahapihistory:

Group of Lao praying around a floral centerpiece (pha kwan), part of a Buddhist baci ceremony. Minneapolis Photograph Collection 1981.

Briefly the Baci or su kwan, which means “calling of the soul,”is a ceremony to celebrate a special event, whether a marriage, a homecoming, a welcome, a birth, or one of the annual festivals. A mother is given a baci after she has recovered form a birth, the sick are given bacis to facilitate a cure, officials are honored by bacis, and novice monks are wished luck with a baci before entering the temple. The Baci ceremony can take place any day of the week and all year long, preferably before noon or before sunset. 

heartoflaos

heartoflaos:

Okay, here’s the thing. Everingham has his own opinion of whether or not “Lao” is used as a derogatory term. (And yeah, that’s his own. It’s not mine, it’s his. I would like to let you guys see a different point of view.)

"Lao" is used as a derogatory term when Laotian immigrants and refugees…

The Plain of Jars in Laos are hundreds of giant stone jars scattered across the Xieng Khouang plains. Excavation by numerous archaeologists have supported the conclusion that these were funeral megaliths due to the human remains, burial goods and ceramics found in association with the stone jars.  There are many local legends telling of their origins from giants who made them to a huge drinking party that was held on the plain after a victory, and these jars held their wine. The Plain of Jars are dated to the Iron Age (500 BCE to 500 CE) and represents a crucial site for the development of the SE Asia civilizations.